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The Worlds apart: Reproductive Health and Rights in an age of Inequality
 
In today’s world, gaps in wealth have grown shockingly wide. Billions of people linger at the bottom, denied their human rights and prospects for a better life. At the top, resources and privileges accrue at explosive rates, pushing the world ever further from the vision of equality embodied in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. 
 
Inequality is often understood in terms of income or wealth—the dividing line between the rich and poor. But, in reality, economic disparities are only one part of the inequality story. Many other social, racial, political and institutional dimensions feed on each other, and together block hope for progress among people on the margins. Two critical dimensions are gender inequality, and inequalities in realizing sexual and reproductive health and rights; the latter, in particular, still receives inadequate attention. Neither explains the totality of inequality in the world today, but both are essential pieces that demand much more action. Without such action, many women and girls will remain caught in a vicious cycle of poverty, diminished capabilities, unfulfilled human rights and unrealized potential—especially in developing countries, where gaps are widest.
 
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The Government of Indonesia & UNFPA: 2016 Key Achievements

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1 in 3 (33.4%) women aged 15-64 years old have ever experienced physical and/or sexual violence perpetrated by their partner or non partner in her lifetime. Around 9.4% women have experienced it in the last 12 months.

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Now more than ever, we must ensure that the marginalized, the forgotten—the ones often left behind—can exercise their fundamental human right to decide, free of coercion, discrimination and violence, when or how often to have children.

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South-South Cooperation: Sharing Indonesia's Best Practices with the World

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In 2014 UNFPA initiated UNALA as an innovative model that engages the private sector in the delivery of health information and services for young people in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. The expected result of UNALA is improved potential for youth (aged 15 to 24 years old) through increase access to SRH information and services in Yogyakarta.
 
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This guidelines introduce important concepts of maternal deaths surveillance, including objectives, targets and special guidelines to implement every monitoring components. 

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INVESTING IN AND SUPPORTING 10-YEAR-OLD GIRLS
 
The United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its accompanying 17 Sustainable Development Goals are the world’s blueprint for equitable, inclusive development that leaves no one behind. This 15-year plan promises to help transform the futures of millions of 10-year-old girls who have traditionally been left behind.
 
Many of the Sustainable Development Goals may only be achieved if everyone’s potential—including that of all 10-year-old girls—is realized. Chief among the Goals is a vision for a world without poverty. But countries cannot end poverty if girls are unable to make a safe and healthy transition from adolescence to adulthood and become productive members of their communities and nations.
 
A 10-year-old girl who is blocked from completing her education means that Sustainable Development Goal 4, quality education for all, will also be unattainable. And without quality education, that 10-year-old girl will not acquire skills to earn a better income and find decent work, as sought in Goal 8. Goal 3 on health and well-being at all ages is not feasible for a girl at risk of HIV or early pregnancy.
 
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The continuation of Programme Cooperation between Government of Indonesia and UNFPA has been formally agreed for next 5 (five) years through the endorsement of the Country Programme Action Plan (CPAP) 2016-2020 by the Minister of National Development Planning/Head of BAPPENAS dan UNFPA Representative in Indonesia on 29 March 2016. This Country Programme aims to support the Government of Indonesia in achieving the global commitments resulting from the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD), the National Mid-Term Development Plan (RPJMN) 2015-2019 and the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals/SDGs 2030. 
 
This Programme Cooperation will be facilitated through a close coordination with Government of Indonesia, civil society organizations including young people and the private sectors. The NDP/BAPPENAS, under the leadership of the Deputy Minister of Human and Societal Development and Cultural Affairs, as the Government Coordinating Agency/GCA, will coordinate and facilitate the Programme Cooperation of CP9 with the related line Ministries.
 
The Pedoman Umum (PEDUM) is a programme management implementation guideline for the Ninth Country Programme that has been developed together by Government of Indonesia and UNFPA as an operational and programme management guidelines for CP9
programme implementation. This PEDUM covers UNFPA programme management from planning, implementation, monitoring and evaluation, reporting and programme closure. The programme management guideline is in-line with the Government regulations on grant management in Indonesia and UNFPA’s rules and regulations. 
 
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We live in a world where humanitarian crises extract mounting costs from economies, communities and individuals. Wars and natural disasters make the headlines, at least initially. Less visible but also costly are the crises of fragility, vulnerability and growing inequality, confining millions of people to the most tenuous hopes for peace and development. 

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